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Synonymous with quality and design, Vincent Sheppard has been creating unique furniture pieces since 1992 but it’s their ‘Lloyd Loom’ furniture range that has the most fascinating history. We delved into their past to see how this iconic furniture came to be.

Joe oak and herbert

1917
An innovative material

It all began during the trying times of World War 1, with a man named Marshall Burns Lloyd. Lloyd ran a business producing baby carriages made of rattan but was soon faced with a shortage due to the war. Like many other creations born out of the hardships of World War 1, this lead him to invent a new paper weave aptly named “Lloyd Loom” in 1917. Much softer and sturdier than traditional rattan, this new and innovative material was made by twisting paper around metal wire.

1919 baby carriages

1922-1940
From Baby carriages to Furniture

Seeing the potential for this innovative technique, London based William Lusty acquired the UK patent in 1922. With his eye on the furniture market, Lusty developed a range of furniture that proved to be hugely successful in Europe. This period of success lasted till the 1940’s when the factory in London was destroyed by an air raid, ending the large scale production of Lloyd Loom.

1922 vintage wimbledon

1992-Today
An icon is born

In 1992 Vincent Sheppard began an import business of Lloyd Loom. Vincent Sheppard worked to modernise the technique, creating a contemporary and beautiful range of furniture. The business was so successful that by 1995, Vincent Sheppard built its own factory in Indonesia. Today, Vincent Sheppard is the world leader in the production of Lloyd Loom furniture. With a focus on craftsmanship, quality and design, their range has expanded to include quality materials such as oak, teak, steel and aluminium.

Roy Cocoon 2

At McKenzie & Willis we are proud to be exclusive suppliers of Vincent Sheppard in New Zealand. Browse the Vincent Sheppard range online or visit any of our stores to view our collection.

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Photography supplied courtesy of Vincent Sheppard